BLOG POSTS YOU WON’T GET CREDIT FOR

The post where you retype the basic recipe for those brownies you really love making. A recipe alone is not a blog post, any more than retyping ten dictionary entries is a blog post. SUGGESTION: Write up the recipe—with no expectation that those words will count toward your total for the week—and include a story about a memorable time you made those brownies, or how you remember your grandmother making those brownies. Pro Tip: have a point.

The post where you discuss ten of the vocabulary terms and/or important historical events and/or figures that you had to learn this week for A.P. U.S. History.

The post that you break up into three posts that is actually your alternative ending for Of Mice and Men that you wrote last year for Mr. Moran.

The post where you copy and paste the batting statistics of Arizona Diamondback players, write a hundred words of summary, then claim six hundred words of content. COME ON.

The three posts which comprise the copied-and-pasted research paper that you did for A.P. Psychology, cut up into “Part One,” “Part Two,” and “Part Three.” Plate-glass windows are less transparent than this ploy.

The five-word post in which you note that you were previously five words short of this week’s word count.

The list of one hundred places you would like to visit before you die, with no discussion of any of these. SUGGESTION: Instead, choose whichever of one of your top five seems the most unusual, and write a blog post about what appeals to you so much about that place. See “Pro Tip,” above.

The list of one hundred anything else.

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